3D Printing – The Future is Here

Kash Gokli – Harvey Mudd College

June 22, 2016

3D printing, once a novelty, has become an invaluable tool used by designers, engineers, researchers and manufacturers. 3D printing is employed throughout the entire development process, from initial design to final production. Hard to believe? According to the Harvard Business Review:

“3D printing is poised to redefine global manufacturing and distribution. It could upend supply chains, business models, customer relationships, and even entrepreneurship itself.”   
The Questions Executives Should Be Asking about 3D Printing, April 19, 2016

On June 22, 2016, APICS San Gabriel Valley presented Kash Gokli, professor of manufacturing and engineering management, who will discuss 3D printing. Kash’s presentation addressed these key areas:

  • What is the right technology for prototypes
  • Tool and part cost case studies
  • Key attributes to consider in choosing a 3D printing system
  • Short and long term cost savings
  • Products you can produce now using this technology
  • Part speed production factors
  • Recycled products usage
  • The overall impact of 3D printing on manufacturing in the future

Using 3D printing to design, engineer and test parts is now a firm reality – it offers many benefits across the entire creative process. Not only can recycled materials be used, but printing can also be done in various ferrous and non-ferrous metals.

Kash Gokli
Professor of Manufacturing Practice
Harvey Mudd College
Claremont, CA

Experience:

  • Professor, Manufacturing Practice, Harvey Mudd College
  • Principal, Lean Transformation ConsultingTransforming organizations by implementing best practices including Lean Manufacturing, Toyota Production System, and Six Sigma
  • VP of Manufacturing, VP of Product Development, Amano USA, a billion dollar global manufacturer of technology productsAs a result of sweeping changes, turned the organization into a profitable, best-in-class business. Significantly improved bottom line performance, quality, and efficiency by leveraging people and processes.Developed innovative, breakthrough products that delighted customers and increased sales by 30%. Directed teams of up to 20 engineers.
  • Manager of Manufacturing Engineering, Campbell Hausfeld, a division of Berkshire Hathaway, a 180 billion dollar corporation

Education:

MS Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL
BS Mechanical Engineering, Gujarat University, India
Six Sigma Black Belt

Download PDM video: (MP4, 946 Mb, 1:16)


Pull Systems: Overview, Challenges and Success Factors
Mike Osterling

April 28, 2016

Pull systems surround us – as simple as the morning delivery of bread to the corner market, and as complex as releasing airplanes for takeoff based on available time slots at the destination airport.

In manufacturing environments many of us have seen success with simple pull systems (Vendor Managed Inventory for hardware, or kanban systems for standard parts) – and many of us have struggled.

In this month’s PDM, you will hear and see examples of kanban systems, FIFO Lanes and pull in administrative environments. You will take part in the conversation where we will discuss challenges with implementation and factors of success. You will see practical and proven approaches to putting in place pull systems in high-mix and job-shop operations.

Presentation Objectives

  • Cover the 3 basic types of pull systems: Kanban*, FIFO Lanes* and VMI*.
  • See their application for purchased parts, sub-assemblies, and work-in-process.
  • Discuss guidelines for when to use each of the different approaches.
  • Facilitated dialogue to discuss implementation issues.
  • Learn some of the common factors of success.

*Kanban is a scheduling system for lean and just-in-time manufacturing.
*FIFO – first in, first out manufacturing material flow
*VMI is vendor-managed inventory

About Mike Osterling

Mike Osterling Mike Osterling is a facilitator, coach, speaker and author. With more than 25 years of leadership experience, he has played a pivotal role in leading transformations in industries such as aerospace, auto, consumer goods, medical products, oil production and construction.
The Kaizen Event Planner: Achieving Rapid Improvement in Office, Service, and Technical Environments Prior to consulting he played a key role in the transformation at a number of Schnieder Electric’s facilities. A founder of San Diego State University’s Lean Enterprise Certificate Program in 1999, he continues to teach there as well as at other universities. Fluent in Spanish, Mike earned his MBA in International Business and a BS in Production and Operations Management. He’s a Certified Trainer for the Implementation of Lean Manufacturing, is a Six Sigma Black Belt and is CPIM certified through APICS.
Value Stream Mapping by Karen Martin and Mike Osterling Mike coauthored the Shingo-prize winning book Value Stream Mapping: How to Visualize Work Flow and Align People for Organizational Transformation. He also co-wrote The Kaizen Event Planner: Achieving Rapid Improvement in Office, Service. As a consultant Mike has supported companies in the US, Mexico, Europe and Asia on their Lean Journey.

Download PDM video: (MP4, 1,109 Mb, 1:27)
Download the presentation slides: (PDF 8.3 Mb)


Transforming a Manufacturing Company

Kash Gokli – Harvey Mudd College

December 13, 2014

Problems with Lean? We all understand that in today’s competitive global economy, organizations need to operate more effectively and profitably than ever before. Increasing productivity and improving quality with reduction in waste are essential to the success factor.

How It Can Help

  • What should be the role of management in these efforts — where do they fail?
  • Why firms have difficulty implementing Lean.
  • Why cultural change has to be addressed.
  • Why Kaizens are not always successful.
  • Innovation can be done with the correct approach.
  • Why a system approach is more important to success than most imagine.
  • When to use what tool — 5S, VSM, Root Cause Analysis, Mistake Proofing, etc.

Our speaker, Kash Goli, is a recognized consultant in the Manufacturing Transformation arena. He currently is in charge of establishing the Manufacturing Practices of Engineering at the prestigious Harvey Mudd College.

You will find him a valuable source of knowledge because he has been in the trenches and has had spectacular results.

Kash Gokli
Professor of Manufacturing Practice
Harvey Mudd College
Claremont, CA

Experience:

  • Professor, Manufacturing Practice, Harvey Mudd College
  • Principal, Lean Transformation ConsultingTransforming organizations by implementing best practices including Lean Manufacturing, Toyota Production System, and Six Sigma
  • VP of Manufacturing, VP of Product Development, Amano USA, a billion dollar global manufacturer of technology productsAs a result of sweeping changes, turned the organization into a profitable, best-in-class business. Significantly improved bottom line performance, quality, and efficiency by leveraging people and processes.Developed innovative, breakthrough products that delighted customers and increased sales by 30%. Directed teams of up to 20 engineers.
  • Manager of Manufacturing Engineering, Campbell Hausfeld, a division of Berkshire Hathaway, a 180 billion dollar corporation

Education:

MS Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL
BS Mechanical Engineering, Gujarat University, India
Six Sigma Black Belt

Download PDM video: (FLV, 370 Mb, 1:32)
Download the presentation slides: (PDF 291 Kb)


Excellence in Inventory Performance Using Best Practices

Doug Howardell – CPIM, PMP Principal at Symbiotic Solutions

October 23, 2014

Objective: Explain a simple methodology used by over 300 companies world wide for managing inventory levels using the best practice, the Plan / Do / Check / Act cycle.

Description:
This presentation explains a simple methodology used by over 300 companies world wide for managing inventories using the Plan / Do / Check / Act cycle. Plan: Measure the current condition then set inventory, cash and profit goals. Do: Take corrective action to improve inventory performance. Check: Track progress to target performance level. Act: Identify root cause of current level of performance then permanently resolve those issues. The methodology was developed by 35 materials managers just like you. Using this method makes the planner/buyers’ jobs easier and helps reduce excess inventories and increase turns, while improving working capital.

Deliverables:
Following this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Implement a better way to measure inventory performance
  2. Utilize a proven methodology to improve inventory performance, cash flow and increase profits
  3. Share the method with colleagues using a known framework they can relate to

Best practices you can take away:

  1. Set inventory performance, cash flow and profit goals to focus the organization
  2. Identify root cause of poor inventory performance so the issues will be permanently resolved
  3. Track performance against targets to keep the improvement effort of course then reset goals to drive further performance improvements

Speaker

Doug Howardell wants to change the world one company at a time. He is a certified by APICS as CPIM and by PMI as PMP. Doug’s a long time independent consultant who he really likes to impassion people to try new approaches and take on new challenges.

 

During the past twenty-five years he has been a key part of a large variety of process improvement projects. Doug has led projects to design new business processes and tools, and to select and implement new business systems. He has extensive experience and expertise in all aspects of project management and operations management. Doug is an active member of the APICS and the Project Management Institute.

In his consulting practice Mr. Howardell has assisted a wide variety of clients gaining first hand experience in commercial manufacturing, aerospace manufacturing, food distribution, capital equipment manufacturing and distribution, pharmaceuticals, electronic assembly, optics manufacturing and machine shops. He has helped large and small companies with the following services:

  • Business Systems specification, selection, implementation, user training and system utilization improvement.
  • Process Improvement for supply chain management, ERP/MRP, distribution, warehousing, inventory control, shop floor control, inventory accuracy, return on assets and development of metrics.
  • Project Management for system implementations, system improvements and general process improvements.

You can find Doug’s thoughts on inventory reduction atwww.InventoryPerformance.com

You can find many articles on a variety of subjects at www.TheACAgroup.com

Download PDM Video: (FLV, 257 MB, 1:17)
Download the presentation slides: (PDF 1,560 KB)


Lean Culture

Samual Obara and Dan Mulloy – Honsha.org

May 8, 2014

Once again we are happy to present Lean from the Toyota perspective.

The Toyota Production System (TPS) has long been hailed as the source of Toyota’s outstanding performance as a manufacturer. Companies from all fields of endeavour from aerospace, consumer products, metal processing, industrial products, and even hospital or government institutions have tried to take advantage of this system.

What is curious is that few manufacturers have managed to imitate Toyota successfully—even though the company has been very open about its practices. Many have assumed they weren’t successful because their Product X business is different, cultural roots of the USA do not allow it, or many other excuses. These are all Lean Myths.

Much has been studied about the Lean tools and techniques. Books, seminars, and workshops have grown in availability and formats. Slowly, companies that have implemented Lean as specific tools from a toolbox have started to realize that the initial impact is often not sustained.

Why is culture a crucial element in a successful Lean deployment? Through a supply chain case application, this presentation clarifies how Toyota addresses key elements for leading a successful Lean journey.

We are excited to present two experienced Toyota consultants from Honsha who will explore why many have been unsuccessful. What will be covered:

  • Importance of leadership
  • Sustainability of TPS
  • How people work
  • How people connect
  • How to improve.

Speakers

Once again Sam Obara joins us to give his great insights into TPS.

Sammy learned and implemented the Toyota Production System (TPS) at Toyota facilities in Japan, Brazil, Venezuela and in the United States.

He has taught Lean to a multitude of consulting firms, educational organizations such as Harvard and Stanford, and even in humanitarian missions thru Asia and Africa.

With close to 30 years of Lean experience, he has helped more than 350 companies. These include TPS projects in environments ranging from schools, to hospitals, to military and many others and in a variety of countries, including China, Mexico, Canada, Indonesia, Brazil, Japan, Austria, the U.K., and the U.S.

He Mastered in Technology Management and is also is a faculty member with the Lean Institute and an instructor of Global Strategy Management for the California Community College system. He is a guest lecturer on Lean for post-graduate classes at Stanford University and San Diego State University, and has been a speaker at conferences sponsored by the American Production and Inventory Control Society, the Association for Productivity and Quality (APQ), and the American Society for Quality (ASQ).

He is fluent in Portuguese, Spanish, and English and has a basic knowledge of Japanese.

He currently aids companies implementing lean through Honsha.org.

Dan Mulloy is a supply chain specialist who has over 30 years experience implementing the principles of the Toyota Production System in a variety of manufacturing, engineering, logistics, and distribution environments.

Through multiple engagements, Dan has provided unique and practical solutions utilizing the TPS methodology while working directly with Toyota Motor Company reengineering their service parts supply chain. Results of Dan’s work have been cited in such works as Jim Womack and Dan Jones’ book, Lean Thinking.

In addition, Dan, the client advisor, will show a case study of a manufacturing turn-around.


Using Value Stream Mapping to its Full Potential (The Missing Link)

Mike Osterling – Osterling Consulting, Inc.

March 13, 2014

Though it is a term highly recognized among Lean practitioners, Value Stream Mapping (VSM) may be one of the most misunderstood and under-utilized Lean principles. Properly applied, Value Stream Mapping is a highly effective methodology for aligning leadership teams, identifying critical leverage points, and connecting organizational goals with tactical improvement activities.

Whether you are looking to improve performance in the factory, field, engineering, or support operations, join us in this interactive session to learn how Value Stream Mapping can surface disconnects and set in place a plan for improving your value delivery. Hear how, when properly applied, Value Stream Mapping can create buy-in and collaboration among the leadership team, engage middle management, and empower the work force for high-impact results.

Speaker

Mike and his co-author Karen Martin have just released a new book on this subject, Value Stream Mapping. How to Visualize Work and Align Leadership for Organizational Transformation. They have a 4.9-star rating on Amazon.com. This book provides the step-by-step how-to on doing Value Stream Mapping and to do it right. This book can be used in the factory, shop, or back office. Some have considered this to be a potential Lean Classic.

Mike Osterling has been providing coaching, facilitation, and consulting support for organizations on their Lean journey for more than 15 years. With solid experience in manufacturing as well as office-based environments, his wide range of engagements positions him to provide direction and support in a wide variety of industries.

Prior to consulting, he worked in operations management at Square D Company for 18 years. Mike is one of the designers of San Diego State University’s “Lean Enterprise Certificate Program” and continues to instruct in that program as well as others. More information at http://mosterling.com/

 

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 619 MB, 1:22)
Download the presentation slides (PDF 2.5 KB)


CSULA Student Chapter Open House

November 28, 2012

Several CSULA students expressed interest in starting a Student Chapter; SGV hosted an open house at the CSULA Career Center Library.


Bottom Line Performance Improvement (The Easy Way)

Sergio Macias

September 19, 2012

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 162 Mb. 51 minutes)


Belt Certification: The Good, The Bad, The Un-Standard Deviation

Ernie Arboles

May 16, 2012

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 162 Mb. 1:06)


Six Sigma Method

Andy Pattantyus

April 18, 2012

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 310 Mb. 1:39/99 minutes)
Download Presentation Slides (PDF, 1.95 Mb)
Download Handout on The Book on Business (PDF, 123 Kb)


How to Construct a Waste-Illuminating Process Flow Diagram

Alan Dunn

November 16, 2011

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 178 Mb. 57 minutes)


Black Belt and Green Belt with Six Sigma

Carlos Conejo

September 21, 2011

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 283 Mb. 1:30/90 minutes)
Download Presentation Handouts (PowerPoint, 500 Kb)


Root Cause Analysis

Samuel Obara

June 22, 2011

Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System (PDF 1.9 Mb)
Download video of the PDM (FLV, 218 Mb. 1:11/71 minutes)
Download Presentation (PDF 1.8 Mb)


White Collar Lean – Kaizen Events for the Office

Mike Osterling

May 19, 2011

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 346 Mb. 1:57/111 minutes).
Download the handout (PDF, 487 Kb)
Send Mike a note to get PDFs of the Kaisen Event worksheets and other resources.


Guiding and Improving Lean Manufacturing (and other initiatives) with Integrated Business Management

Rick C. Burris – Oliver Wight Consultants

April 20, 2011

Download video of the PDM (FLV, 266 Mb). It is 1:25 hrs. long. We got the camcorder two hours before the event, so it’s a bit rough at the start.


The Essence of Lean Enterprise

Samuel Obara

February 16, 2011

Check out his association’s website. Several good downloads.


Inventory Quality Ratio Using Plan, Do, Check, Act

Doug Howardell

March 3, 2010

Download Presentation (PDF 1.65 MB)


Kanban Cards

Andy Pattantyus

October 28, 2009

Download Presentation (PDF 739KB)